Puctec ZD-987 solder/ desolder station

This is a bit off the beaten track, but might be useful. There’s a first time for everything……

I’ve used a desoldering hand pump device forever, and they work ok. For about a week. You really can’t expect too much from something that costs a couple of quid, can you? And also, if you have a lot of desoldering to do you can get a serious case of ‘pumper’s thumb (?)’ We will not go into that; but it hurts.

The big plus for this soldering/ desoldering station was that it was cheap. I may as well be brutally honest. Most of the other soldering stations (Weller, Antex, etc.) would need me to sell my grandma to drum up the cash. As I don’t have a grandma any more, my style is somewhat cramped in that investment area. It was actually surprisingly good (I’m off grandma’s now) but for one piece of missing information. It was like building a flat pack bookcase from Korea (or somewhere else foreign). On following the instructions to the letter (usually an interpretation from the early Sanskrit) it looks remarkably like a food mixer. A food mixer with a lot of screws missing.

There is a glass tube with a spring in it that should fit behind the sucky-pipe-thing. I found that a jack for a Transit van was helpful in installing this. You really have to have powerful thumbs to put this in. It is probably worth an investment in a thumb-building-up course as you have to take the tube out on a regular basis to clean out the solder waste. Except there isn’t any waste if the temperature isn’t effectively set, because it won’t desolder.

Here is the first real crunch. In the instruction sheet, it says that leaded solder melts at 180 degrees C, and leadless solder 220 degrees C. Which it does. However after some experimentation, we find that after setting the temperature to around that recommended level, we pull off the tracks quite well, but don’t actually desolder anything.

You need to desolder at around 335 degrees C. At that level it does work very well.

However, another problem (which is described in the instructions) is that at high heat levels (see workable operating temperatures) the solder tends to clog the intake pipe with a lump of lead. This lump of lead (also according to the operating instructions) you can’t get out. That’s because all the tin content of the solder alloy has been burnt off, which leaves you with a lump of lead that you can’t shift with the poking tool. Fair do’s though; Puctec do inform you of this. And also that your nice desoldering machine is unusable. Decent of them.

There is a way round this. You might have to do this a lot if you are soldering valvebase joints where there is a lot of solder to get rid of. You bring the temperature up above 400 degrees C and thump the cleaning stick in and out repeatedly. As the temperature gets up to around 380+ the solder will shift and you will have a clean tube. Sounds a bit brutal, but it works and is a lot better than chucking your nice new machine away.

Cuppa tea! And I certainly deserve a macaroon for this one.

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