A Very Quiet Fender Twin Reverb

I hadn’t seen John for some years, but he turned up out of the blue with the Fender described above.

Even if I looked at the amp from a distance of a lot of miles I would have known it was a ‘Reissue’. I’ve just looked up ‘Reissue’ in ‘Ballooning for Aquatics’ and it said ”Consult ’Skiing for Quadrupeds’.” Which said ‘Consult “Brain Surgery with Lump Hammers”.’ So I finished up guessing. It must mean, I thought, something old brought out again, much later. Wrong.

What it really means is ‘Nick a label off a really nice amp and make a new one that’s nothing like it.’

The overriding problem with current reissues of ‘classic’ amps, is that it’s impossible to do unless you have a raft of prospective customers with bottomless back accounts. I’ve got one of those, but only because it has a big hole in the bottom. A reissue amp has to use pcb’s. If it used solder wells, tagstrips, turret board; as the original Vox, Hiwatt, Marshalls(old ones), Fender (old ones), Selmer, Supro, Carlsbro (old ones) etc….etc…. it would be monumentally expensive (there are still a few of this breed around) because people would have to do much of the building, as opposed to computers.

This gets me (eventually) to John’s Fender Twin reissue. The almost insuperable problem of valves and pcb’s not being mutually on speaking terms rears its head. In this case the output valve bases (4x 6L6) are soldered directly through the pcb, and…… as the valves hang from the bases the heat rises and…..they get hot!!!! And if we heat up a solder joint a lot of times (it doesn’t even need to be all that hot; the melting point of tin is 232degrees c and lead is 327 c so anything over 232c burns off the tin and leaves the lead.) So it drives off the tin content of the joint and you finish up with lead. And usually cracked lead. The alloy of solder is usually 65%tin to 35% lead, and the resistivity of tin is 11,5 ohm.m whereas lead’s resistivity is 21,3 ohm.m. This means that the solder joint has twice the resistance when the tin has gone.

Another property of lead is that its flexibility is poor, and the expansion and contraction of the metal with heating produces cracks and poor contact with the joint. At its most extreme the joint can become an insulator, and your nice guitar sound has become nothing at all at the other side of this joint (which is known as a ‘dry joint’ or a ‘cracked joint’).

It’s about here when I wish I had a bit more interest in photos and things, because it would be useful. However….the fault with John’s amp was minimal, but as with a lot of pcb-based amps, not that cheap. To correctly replace a component in a pcb, you have to be able to get to the to the UNDERSIDE of the board. Pheeew! That can mean taking off wiring, marking where it came from, taking the pcb out, all to get to the track side of the pcb. If you don’t do that (it’s possible to cheat by cutting off the component and soldering to the resultant wire sticking out) you run the risk of dry joints, shorts to chassis and missing any burned tracks that might be under there. In the original version, the solder wells are visible, and the pcb dismantling zero, because there aren’t any. So the job takes five minutes, and the rest of the time can be usefully spent cleaning up and servicing.

Also, on this amp there are two wirewound dropper resistors (270 ohm if memory serves) that run hot. That’s ok, they drop the voltage from around +- 50 volts down to +- 17 volts to supply the chips and relays that the amp uses for channel switching. These two resistors are flat to the board (not ok), and so heat up the tracks underneath, and are also close to two 1000uF 35 volt capacitors which don’t like the heat. For an amp of this age (1994-ish and on) these components are ready for replacement and you need to have a good look and resolder all the joints under there.

Just as an aside, it’s interesting to note that any mortgage you might have taken out to buy a Mega-Hugely-Marvellous-Platinum Plated- Radar Controlled…..erm….guitar lead….would be a totally daft investment if you had a dry joint on the input socket.

To put this problem right would cost you 0.00000001% of your investment with Wonderful Guitar Leads Inc.

Which is but a small increase on my macaroon outlay for the decade. Tea.

 

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